AS Roma’s new stadium

A new home for the Roma soccer team. Lots of pictures. 

I’m unimpressed. Bringing skyboxes to Italy? Not that the current Stadio Olimpico is a great building, easy to get to or get away from! I look forward to reading about cost overruns and work delays.

The interview mentions that there’s going to be a Roma Village – a 365 day shopping extravaganza! But it’s in the middle of nowhere . . . .  Why do people believe in making Destination Stadiums?

So the loud noise going on all afternoon was this:

Incontro con la Scuola cattolica italiana

Piazza San Pietro
ore 16.15

(from the Vatican site)

God help us – and I mean that quite unironically – they’re playing John Lennon’s “Imagine” right now. I hope we can blame it on their typical non-English speaker failure to comprehend the lyrics.

Later:

Wow – I certainly understand the long and grand tradition of re-valorizing love poetry as being addressed to Our Lord . . . but Slave to Love?

The Final Presentation came with a view!

The last presenter wanted to visit Castel Sant’Angelo – so we finished with a great view of Rome!

DSC_3629

Kim Giegerich, Katie Cornell, and Nic Stewart listen to Annabel Cryan describe the final scene of Tosca, when Tosca throws herself off the top of Castel Sant’Angelo. I’m glad Katie was there, because she gave the first of these presentations, and described the first act of the opera during her presentation at Sant’Andrea della Valle. Nice bookends – and a great place to finish the course.

Carciofi all romana

My cooked contribution to Easter Dinner at my colleague’s apartment. I bought pre-cleaned artichokes at the market (still had to dig the chokes out myself). They’re stuffed with a mint/parsley/garlic mix and cooked (white wine and lemon in the water. Yum! I’ll be making these for the parents this summer, even if I have to clean the artichokes myself!

Here’s the recipe I used.

artichokes

Holy Saturday

Quiet day in Rome (literally!).

I’m about to head out and buy some artichokes to cook for dinner tomorrow (my colleague Christine is making a leg of lamb!). Easter Vigil tonight – I haven’t decided between the extremely convenient Chiesa Nuova or a mild trek to Santa Prassede — we’ll see if it’s raining by the time I need to leave.

Prayers for Cate tonight as she enters the Church!

San Carlino and Sant Andrea

S Carlino domeBorromini – San Carlo alle quattro fontane – dome. Teaching under this . . . life doesn’t get much better.

Tuesday I got to do one of the great comparison questions live. Borromini’s San Carlo alle quattro fontane and Bernini’s Sant’Andrea al Quirinale are a five minute walk apart. So we visited both of them. I prefer San Carlino, but there’s is lots that is great about Sant’Andrea – especially the broken pediment with St Andrew being carried up to heaven on a cloud. Still, the interlocking coffers in decreasing size as the eye runs up the dome at San Carlino? Magic.

S Andrea DomeThat second opening close to the bottom of the photo – a little cupola designed to light the altar. One of Bernini’s habits – and quite a good one.

Annoying laundry complaint

So I washed my new black sweater (thanks, Cate – I love it!) for the first time on Saturday. It had picked up some little spots of this and that across the semester. Our rendezvous Monday morning was at 9, and it was chilly enough for a sweater. I had cappuccino and a cornetto con ciocolato at a bar up on the Quirinale close to the rendezvous point. It wasn’t firm chocolate or creamy nutella – it was runny delicious chocolaty goodness which dribbled down my sweater front.

Alas – it’s in the wash again, and I’m sure it’s fading.

A new bridge in Rome

Ponte Musica from P Duca d'Aosta

 

This is the Ponte della Musica, a 21st century pedestrian/bike bridge that connects the Flaminio neighborhood to the Foro Italico/Monte Mario area – and yes, that’s the dome of St Peter’s in the distance.

Ponte Musica toward FlaminioThe center is a paved bike zone, but most people seem to prefer the boardwalk sides. He’s pedaling toward Flaminio, MAXXI, and the Auditorium. This far up the Tiber there are lots of rowers and kayakers – if you look closely, one of those 4s is kayaking rather than rowing.

Ponte Musica rowersI was on my way to meet the class at Foro Italico to talk about Fascist architecture – it’s nice to see some other Modern work in Rome. Otherwise, Rome doesn’t have a lot of very interesting architecture since World War II.

There’s another 21st Century bridge about as far downstream from Tiber Island as Ponte della Musica is upstream – I thought I had blogged about it earlier, but evidently not! So I promise to rustle up some of those pictures and post them.

Busy weekend

And not the good way. I had a lot of grading to do, and it’s not done yet (though we will be able to hand back sketchbooks tomorrow morning). I had to preview the site for tomorrow – construction is all too frequent at Foro Italico! But that’s the good news. We’re going to Stadio dei marmi tomorrow, one of my favorite places in Rome to show people the neuroses of Fascism.

The stadium is a track venue surrounded by more than 50 monumental marble statues of athletes – most of the nude, like Skiing in the center of the picture. Ice Hockey, just beyond, is clothed. Go figure.

Skiing and HockeyThe big modern stadium to the right is where both A.S. Roma and S.S. Lazio play soccer. I’ll never figure that one out, either.